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Murach’s Dreamweaver CC 2014

by Zak Ruvalcaba
17 chapters, 610 pages, 253 illustrations
Published August 2014
ISBN 978-1-890774-77-6
Print: $43.60
List Price: $54.50 Save 20%
eBook: $35.60
List Price: $44.50 Save 20%
Print + eBook: $51.60
List Price: $64.50 Save 20%

Since 1996, Dreamweaver has been the leading product for web developers who want to build web pages by using a visual interface instead of writing the HTML code themselves. Now, Dreamweaver CC 2014 takes that to a new level, with tools that are designed to support today’s best web design practices. For instance, the new CSS Designer provides a better interface for adding CSS and CSS3 to style sheets. Responsive Web Design is supported with media queries as well as Fluid Grid Layouts. jQuery and jQuery UI have replaced Adobe’s proprietary Spry. And that’s just the start.

The trick, of course, is in learning how to use all of the windows, panels, and toolbars that Dreamweaver provides, and in integrating those navigational skills with all the skills that you need to build modern, standards-compliant websites. That’s where this book comes in. Unlike other Dreamweaver books, this one blends all of the skills that you need with the proven instructional approach that makes Murach books so effective.

College Instructors

Go to our instructor’s site to learn more about this book and its instructor’s materials.

 

Unlike the 'quick and dirty' guides that promise near-instant competency with quick routines and guidelines, Murach's really takes the time to explore its subject well, providing web designers with not just a hasty overview, but a lesson plan incorporating all the skills needed to master all of Dreamweaver's many tools and functions, whether they be beginning or advanced."

D. Donovan, eBook Reviewer, MBR

  • About this Book
  • Table of Contents
  • FREE Downloads
  • Book FAQs
  • Corrections
  • Reviews

Who this book is for

  • Beginning web developers who want to learn how to use Dreamweaver so they can get by with minimal HTML and CSS skills
  • HTML and CSS developers who want to work more efficiently by using the Dreamweaver interface
  • JavaScript and jQuery programmers who are looking for a better way to build and enhance web pages
  • Server-side programmers who are looking for an efficient way to build and enhance web pages

What you’ll learn in this book

Section 1: Get started right

Section 1 presents a crash course in Dreamweaver that has you developing web pages at a professional level after just six chapters. These chapters don’t just show you how to use Dreamweaver to build web pages. They also show you how to use Dreamweaver so it generates the HTML and CSS for a page in a way that is consistent with the best practices of modern website development. That includes the use of HTML5 semantics, external style sheets, and CSS3.

When you finish the first 6 chapters, you will have the perspective and skills you need for developing professional web pages in Dreamweaver. Then, you can add to those skills by reading any of the chapters in the next two sections...and you don’t have to read those sections or chapters in sequence. The one exception is that you should read chapter 7 before chapter 8 since they are closely related.

Section 2: More Dreamweaver skills as you need them

The seven chapters in section 2 let you learn new Dreamweaver skills whenever you need them. That includes:

  • How to use media queries to implement Responsive Web Design so your web pages work right in desktop browsers as well as in mobile devices
  • How to implement Responsive Web Design by using Dreamweaver’s Fluid Grid Layout feature
  • How to use templates and library items to save time and build consistent web pages
  • How to add tables to your web pages
  • How to add audio or video to a page by using HTML5 elements instead of plug-ins
  • How to use the Dreamweaver features that can help you work more productively
  • How to deploy an application to a web server

Section 3: How to create interactive and mobile web pages

The four chapters in this section show you how to use the Dreamweaver features for creating interactive and mobile web pages. That includes:

  • How to add forms to your pages that send user entries to your web server for processing
  • How to use Dreamweaver to add JavaScript features like image galleries to a web page...without knowing how to code JavaScript
  • How to use Dreamweaver to add jQuery and jQuery UI features like accordions and tabs to your pages...without knowing how to use jQuery or jQuery UI
  • How to use jQuery Mobile to build mobile websites, which in some cases is a practical alternative to Responsive Web Design

Why you’ll learn faster and better with this book

Like all our books, this one has features that you won’t find in competing books. That’s why we believe you’ll learn faster and better with our book than with any other. Here are just a few of those features.

  • From the first page to the last, this book shows you how to use the best HTML and CSS practices, even though you’re using Dreamweaver to generate the HTML and CSS. That way, you’ll be developing web pages at a professional level from the start. In contrast, most competing books focus on the Dreamweaver visual interface without worrying about the code that it generates.
  • Chapter 2 presents the least any Dreamweaver user should know about HTML and CSS. That’s because you can’t be an effective Dreamweaver user without understanding the HTML and CSS that Dreamweaver generates. In fact, you will often want to review the generated code to make sure everything works correctly. In particular, this chapter presents the proper use of HTML5 semantics and external style sheets...essential web development skills that are treated too late or too lightly in most Dreamweaver books.
  • If you page through this book, you’ll see that all of the information is presented in “paired pages,” with the essential syntax, guidelines, and examples on the right page and the perspective and extra explanation on the left page. This helps you learn faster by reading less...and this is the ideal reference format for a complicated IDE like Dreamweaver.
  • The exercises at the end of each chapter guide you through the development of web pages using the skills that have been presented in the chapter. Because Dreamweaver has a complicated visual interface that is hard to master, these exercises are an essential part of the learning process. What makes our exercises so effective is that they never introduce skills that haven’t already been presented in the text. In contrast, most Dreamweaver books try to teach new skills by stepping the readers through them...even though that’s a frustrating, tedious, and ineffective way to learn all that you need to know to build websites on your own.

What software you need

To develop web pages with Dreamweaver CC, you first need to subscribe to the Adobe Creative Cloud. Then, you can pick a Dreamweaver CC payment plan that fits your budget. These plans start at $19.99 per month if you’re willing to commit to a full-year plan. Or, if you aren’t ready to commit, you can sign up for 30-day free trial. For more information on installing Dreamweaver, you can go to appendix A in the book.

Then, to test a web page, you need multiple web browsers. Because Internet Explorer is the browser that is the least standard, you should test all of your web pages in that browser. You should also test your web pages in one or more of the standard browsers, including Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Opera. All of these browsers are free, and appendix A in the book shows how to install them.

Companion books

Murach’s HTML5 and CSS3 (Third Edition)

Frankly, you can’t be a good Dreamweaver developer without understanding the HTML and CSS that it generates. In fact, the more you know about HTML and CSS, including HTML5 and CSS3, the more productive you’ll be with Dreamweaver. That’s why Murach’s HTML5 and CSS3 (Third Edition) is the perfect companion to our Dreamweaver book.

Murach’s jQuery (Second Edition)

You will of course be able to get more from the Dreamweaver behaviors and jQuery features if you understand the JavaScript and jQuery that is generated for them. That’s why we recommend Murach’s jQuery (Second Edition) as a companion to our Dreamweaver and HTML5 books. With all three books on your desk, you’ll have the answers to all of your client-side questions and you’ll be able to take Dreamweaver to the next level.

View the table of contents for this book in a PDF: Table of Contents (PDF)

Click on any chapter title to display or hide its content.

Section 1 A crash course in Dreamweaver

Chapter 1 An introduction to web development with Dreamweaver

How web applications work

The components of a web application

How static web pages are processed

How dynamic web pages are processed

A survey of web browsers and server-side scripting languages

How JavaScript and jQuery fit into web development

Web development and Dreamweaver CC

A tour of the Dreamweaver interface

How to use the Welcome screen

How to create a Dreamweaver site

How to work with the Document window in Design view

How to work with the Document window in Code view

How to work with the Document window in Live view

How to use the Files panel

How to preview a web page

How to get help

How to change the workspace and set preferences

How to use a predefined workspace layout

How to work with panels

How to set preferences

Chapter 2 An introduction to HTML5 and CSS3

How web pages developed with Dreamweaver work

A web page developed with Dreamweaver

The HTML for the web page

The CSS for the web page

The HTML skills that you need

The basic structure of an HTML document

How to code HTML elements

How to use the div and span elements

How to use the HTML5 semantic elements

The CSS skills that you need

Three ways to provide CSS styles for a web page

How to code CSS rule sets and comments

How to code selectors for elements, ids, and classes

How to code descendant, pseudo-class, and combination selectors

How to provide for cross-browser compatibility

How to make HTML5 pages work with older browsers

How to use the normalize.css style sheet

Chapter 3 How to build a website with Dreamweaver

How to create a site and add a web page

How to create a Dreamweaver site

How to create a new web page

How to define the basic appearance of a web page

How to add content to a web page

How to work with HTML in Dreamweaver

How to use the Property Inspector to work with HTML

How to use the Insert panel to work with HTML

How to use the Insert panel to add structural elements

How to work with CSS in Dreamweaver

How to use the CSS Designer to create style rules and styles

How to use the CSS Designer to modify, add, and delete styles

How to use the Property Inspector to display and modify styles

How to use Element Live Display to work with classes and IDs

How to work with external style sheets

How to create an external style sheet

How to move style rules and copy styles

How to attach an external style sheet to a web page

How to create a style sheet for printing

Other skills for working with Dreamweaver sites

How to validate a web page

How to set browser preferences

How to delete, edit, and duplicate sites

Chapter 4 How to work with text, images, and links

How to work with text

How to add text to a web page

How to edit the text in a web page

How to insert special characters

How to use the Property Inspector to work with text

How to check the spelling in a web page

How to work with images

Types of images for the Web

How to insert images

How to use the Property Inspector to work with images

How to use the Quick Property Inspector to work with images

How to optimize images

How to work with hyperlinks

How to create text links

How to create image links

How to create email, phone, and Skype links

How to create and link to placeholders

How to check and change links site wide

Chapter 5 How to use CSS to format text

How to specify measurements and colors

How to specify measurements

How to specify colors

How to work with text

How to set the font family

How to set other properties for styling fonts

How to indent and align text

How to transform and decorate text

How to add shadows to text

A web page with formatted text

The page layout for the web page

The HTML for the web page

The CSS for the web page

How to manage web fonts

How to work with Adobe Edge Web Fonts

How to work with local web fonts

How to work with custom font stacks

Chapter 6 How to use CSS for page layout, borders, and backgrounds

How to size and space elements

An introduction to the box model

How to set heights and widths

How to set margins

How to set padding

A web page that illustrates sizing and spacing

How to set borders and backgrounds

How to set borders

How to add rounded corners and shadows

How to set background colors and images

How to set background gradients

A web page that uses borders and backgrounds

How to format lists

The properties for formatting lists

Examples of unordered and ordered lists

How to use an unordered list to create a navigation menu

How to create a multi-tier navigation menu

How to float elements

The properties for floating and clearing elements

How to use floating in a 2-column layout

How to use floating in a 3-column layout

How to position elements

Four ways to position an element

How to use absolute positioning

How to use fixed positioning

Section 2 More Dreamweaver skills as you need them

Chapter 7 How to use media queries to create a responsive design

An introduction to Responsive Web Design

How to provide pages for mobile devices

The need for Responsive Web Design

How to plan a responsive design

How to use CSS3 media queries

How to control the mobile viewport

An introduction to media queries

How to create media queries in the CSS Designer

How to display a page at different screen sizes

A web page that uses Responsive Web Design

The web page in a desktop browser

How to style the media query for a tablet in portrait orientation

How to style the media query for a smart phone in landscape orientation

How to style the media query for a smart phone in portrait orientation

How to use third-party tools for responsive designs

How to use Responsive Menu to create a drop-down menu

How to use ProtoFluid to test a responsive design

Chapter 8 How to work with fluid layouts

An introduction to fluid layouts

Fluid layouts vs. fixed layouts

How to create a website that uses a fluid layout

How the style sheet for a fluid layout works

How to implement a mobile layout

How to use the visual aids for working with a fluid layout

How to add and work with fluid elements

How to add and format content

How to create a fluid navigation menu

How to implement a tablet or desktop layout

How to create a multi-column layout

How to format tablet and desktop layouts

How to modify a fluid navigation menu for tablet and desktop layouts

Chapter 9 How to use templates and library items

Basic skills for creating and using templates

An introduction to templates

How to create a template

How to add editable regions to a template

How to base a web page on a template

How to apply a template to an existing web page

How to update a site with changes made to a template

More skills for working with templates

How to create and use optional regions

How to create and use repeating regions and repeating tables

How to create and use editable tag attributes

How to create and use nested templates

How to use the Assets panel to work with templates

Other template features you should know about

How to create and use library items

How to create a library item

How to use the Assets panel to work with library items

How to use library items with templates

Chapter 10 How to add audio, video, and animations to a website

An introduction to media on the web

Common media types for video and audio

Video codecs

Audio codecs

Audio and video support in current browsers

How to encode media

How to add audio and video

How to add HTML5 audio

How to add HTML5 video

How to add Flash video

How to add other types of media

A web page that offers both audio and video

How to add animations and Canvas drawings

How to add Flash animations

How to add Edge Animate compositions

How to add an HTML5 Canvas drawing

A web page with a Flash animation and an Edge Animate composition

Chapter 11 How to work with tables

Basic skills for working with tables

An introduction to tables

How to insert a table

How to select tables, columns, rows, and cells

How to use the Property Inspector to work with tables

How to use the Property Inspector to work with table cells

How to insert and delete rows and columns

How to merge and split cells

Other skills for working with tables

How to import tabular data

How to sort a table

Chapter 12 How to work more efficiently in Dreamweaver

How to use snippets

How to use the Snippets panel to work with Snippets

How to create custom snippets

How to use the Assets panel

How the Assets panel works

How to create and work with favorites

How to use the find and replace feature

How the find and replace feature works

How to use the Search panel

How to use the advanced options for finding text

How to find and replace specific tags

How to work with commands

A summary of the built-in commands

How to use the History panel

How to create and work with custom commands

Other skills for improving your efficiency

How to use Element Quick View

How to create and manage custom layouts

How to set keyboard shortcuts

Chapter 13 How to deploy a website and collaborate with a team

How to get a web host and domain name

How to find a web host

How to get a domain name

How to transfer files to and from your web host

How to define a remote server

How to upload and download files

How to use the expanded Files panel

How to synchronize a website

How to use the Check In/Check Out feature

How to configure the Check In/Check Out feature

How to check in files

How to check out files

How to export, import, and duplicate a site

How to export a site

How to import a site

How to duplicate a site

How to work with design notes

How to create a design note

How to customize a design note

How to display design note values in the Files panel

Three more skills for deploying a website

How to test a website that has been uploaded to the web server

How to get your website into search engines and directories

How to control which pages are indexed and visited

Section 3 How to create interactive and mobile web pages

Chapter 14 How to work with forms

How to use forms and controls

How to create a form

How to use text fields

How to use buttons

How to use radio buttons and check boxes

How to use radio button and check box groups

How to use drop-down lists and list boxes

How to use text areas

How to use labels

How to use fieldsets to visually group controls

How to use file-upload fields

A web page with a form that uses the classic HTML controls

Other skills for working with forms

How to align controls

How to format controls

How to set the tab order and assign access keys

How to use the HTML5 properties and CSS3 selectors for data validation

How to use regular expressions for data validation

How to use the HTML5 controls

How to use the Email, Url, and Tel controls

How to use the Number and Range controls

How to use the date and time controls

How to use the Search control for a search function

How to use the Color control

A web page with a form that uses HTML5 controls and data validation

Chapter 15 How to use Dreamweaver behaviors and CSS transitions

An introduction to JavaScript and behaviors

How JavaScript works

How to use behaviors

How to change the event that triggers a behavior

A summary of the Dreamweaver behaviors

How to use the most common behaviors

How to use the Popup Message behavior

How to use the Swap Image behavior

How to use the Show-Hide Elements behavior

How to use the Go To URL behavior

How to use the Open Browser Window behavior

How to use the Jump Menu and Jump Menu Go behaviors

How to use the Change Property behavior

How to use the Set Text behaviors

How to use the Validate Form behavior

How to use the Check Plugin behavior

An introduction to CSS3 transitions

How transitions work

How to create a transition in Dreamweaver

Chapter 16 How to use jQuery and jQuery UI

An introduction to jQuery and jQuery UI

What jQuery and jQuery UI are

How Dreamweaver implements jQuery and jQuery UI

How to use the jQuery UI widgets

How to use any widget

How to use the Accordion widget

How to use the Tabs widget

How to use the Datepicker widget

How to use the Button and Dialog widgets

How to use the Autocomplete widget

A web page that uses jQuery UI widgets

An introduction to the jQuery UI effects

How to use any effect

How to set the options for an effect

An introduction to jQuery plugins

How to use any plugin

The code for a sample plugin

Chapter 17 How to use jQuery mobile

An introduction to jQuery Mobile

How to redirect a user to a mobile website

What jQuery Mobile is

How Dreamweaver implements jQuery Mobile

How to create one web page with jQuery Mobile

How to use jQuery Mobile to create a mobile website

How to create multiple web pages in a single HTML file

How to use dialog boxes and transitions

How to create buttons

How to create a navigation bar

How to format content with jQuery Mobile

The default styles that jQuery Mobile uses

How to use swatches to apply themes

How to use jQuery Mobile for page layout

How to lay out your content in two columns

How to create an accordion

How to create collapsible content blocks

How to create a contents list

A mobile website that uses jQuery Mobile

Resources

Appendix A How to set up your computer for this book

How to install the Creative Cloud and Dreamweaver CC

On a Windows system

On a Mac OS X system

How to install Chrome

How to install and use the source code for this book

On a Windows system

On a Mac OS X system

 

Sample chapters

Chapter 3: How to build a website with Dreamweaver

To give you an idea of how well this book works, you can download this free chapter. It shows how to use Dreamweaver to build a simple website, including its HTML and CSS.

Chapter 3 PDF Download Now

Book applications and exercises

This download includes:

  • the folders and files for all of the examples in the book
  • the starting folders and files for the exercises in the book
  • the solutions to the book exercises so you can check your work

Appendix A in the book shows how to install and use these files on Windows and Mac systems.

Exe file for Windows (48.7 MB) Download Now

Zip file for any system (48.7 MB) Download Now

On this page, we’ll be posting answers to the questions that come up most often about this book. So if you have any questions that you haven’t found answered here at our site, please email us. Thanks!

The 2014.1 and 2015 releases of Dreamweaver CC

In October 2014, Adobe released Dreamweaver CC 2014.1. In July of 2015, they released Dreamweaver CC 2015. To find out how these releases affect the material presented in our book, please view this PDF:
What's changed in Dreamweaver CC

To view the corrections for this book in a PDF, just click on this link: View the corrections

Then, if you find any other errors, please email us so we can correct them in the next printing of the book. Thank you!

Wednesday, 11 February 2015

I was new to Dreamweaver, but this book got me going fast and I was able to develop a complete website in just a few short weeks.

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College Instructors

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